When things go wrong (and they sometimes will) . . .

Triquetra
Triquetra

Earlier this week, I chatted online with a man who indicated he’d like to commission several quilts.

I quoted him a price that he said sounded reasonable, and we both expressed our excitement about working together.

Since the first quilt was meant as a wedding gift fairly soon, I began creating Celtic knot designs for the client to choose from.

I also started getting ideas how I could improve my reverse applique technique.

I made a sample of a single Celtic knot shape to see how my idea fared . . . it was a rousing success!!

Early this morning, I decided to make a larger sample of a complete knot. I chose the Triquetra, shown above.

First, I laid a piece of clear vinyl over the drawing and traced the outlines of the shapes I’d need. I planned to use this for shape placement.

Traced shapes
Traced shapes

Next, I traced the same shapes on paper-backed fusible web.

I laid my vinyl placement guide on my background fabric and slid the fusible web shapes between the fabric and the guide. I used the previously traced lines to align the shapes. Then, I pinned the shapes in place before taking the piece to my ironing table and fusing the shapes in place.

First pieces positioned, pinned, and fused into place
First pieces positioned, pinned, and fused into place

I continued with the remaining shapes until they were all fused into place.

Second shapes fused into place
Second shapes fused into place
Final shapes fused into place
Final shapes fused into place

Now here’s where it gets tricky:

I cut openings in the background fabric, leaving a small seam allowance of fusible web around the edges.

Openings cut in background fabric
Openings cut in background fabric

I did not cut ALL the openings because the background fabric was becoming less-than-stable and difficult to handle.

The idea was to clip the fusible seam allowances as need be, then fold them to the reverse of the background fabric and press flat. Once the seam allowances had been pressed, I would remove the paper backing, lay the background fabric on top of the fabric I wanted to show through the openings, and fuse it into place.

It didn’t work that way . . .

Because of the fabric instability, it was difficult to lay the background fabric flat; puckers occurred, and the fusible web didn’t hold.

The process was more difficult than it was worth. I WON’T be doing that again!

I’m going back to my previous method of sewing the two layers together, cutting openings in the top layer only, and using a decorative stitch around the edges before trimming the excess fabric from the backside.

Oh, and the potential client? I haven’t heard from him since Tuesday . . . I’m so disappointed.

(An editorial note:  I heard from the client the day AFTER I wrote this post . . . figures.  We’re back in business, folks!)

 

 

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