Binding the Satin Log Cabin

Now, don’t get me wrong, but I enjoy my job. It keeps my mind active; like solving little jigsaw puzzles all day long.

But I hate that my job eats into my creative pursuits. By the time I get home most evenings, quilting is the last thing on my mind.

Here’s my final push to finish Norma’s quilt . . .

I bought black satin for the binding. I cut it into 4-inch bias strips, sewed them end-to-end, and pressed the resulting strip in half.

Starting along the middle of one side of the quilt, and leaving a long tail free, I pinned the bias strip to the quilt, raw edges even.

Pinning the satin binding to the quilt
Pinning the satin binding to the quilt

I stitched the binding to the quilt, stopping 1/2 inch from the end, pivoting the quilt, and stitching off the edge of the quilt.

I folded the bias binding back so the raw edge was even with the quilt.

Folding back the bias binding
Folding back the bias binding

Then, I folded the binding so the fold was even with the edge of the quilt. I pinned and stitched the binding, stopping 1/2 inch from the next corner, and repeated the folding back and folding forward all around the quilt.

Folding the bias binding forward
Folding the bias binding forward

Once I had stitched around all four corners, all that remained was to sew the two ends together.

The two ends
The two ends

Keeping them as flat as possible, I nested the longer end inside the shorter one. I marked a line on the longer end where it met the shorter end. I opened out the longer end and cut the excess binding 1 inch past my marked line. I opened out the shorter end and pinned the two ends together, right sides together. I stitched them with a 1/2 in seam, pressed the binding, then pinned and stitched the binding to the quilt.

Stitching the ends of the binding together
Stitching the ends of the binding together

Starting at a corner, I turned the binding to the back of the quilt and pinned it into place. I stitched along the seam, pulling out the pins as I go.

Pinning the binding in place before stitching
Pinning the binding in place before stitching

The fold of the binding extends past the stitching line to ensure that I catch it when I sew from the front. Yes, it leaves a small flap of fabric on the back, but that’s how I roll.

A shot of the back . . .
A shot of the back . . .

Your mileage may vary . . .

Now, I just need to print a label for the back of the quilt . . .

I will deliver the quilt to Norma this weekend . . . she’s giving it to her son when he comes home for Easter.

2 thoughts on “Binding the Satin Log Cabin

  1. You’re almost there. Good for you. That binding and turning the corners and pinning was a wonderful tutorial. I’m sure Norma and son will be very happy!!
    Take care.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *