Acrylic Celtic Knot Templates!!

(Originally published June 23, 2012)

Some time ago, I posted my method of large-scale Celtic knot applique. Simply put, I traced the shapes to paper-backed fusible web, fused the web to my fabric, and cut out the individual shapes.

It was tedious and time-consuming. I wondered if there was a better way . . .

I had a set of acrylic templates made of the three shapes I commonly use for Celtic knots.

Acrylic Celtic knot templates
Acrylic Celtic knot templates

These templates are clear; they arrived with paper on one side to prevent scratching in transit. The paper peels off.

What I especially like is that they’re reversible. When I was tracing individual shapes on the paper-backed fusible web, I traced adhesive side up, otherwise the resulting shapes were reversed.

Here’s how I use them:

1. Fuse the paper-backed fusible web to the wrong side of your fabric, and do not remove the paper.

Fusible web applied to fabric
Fusible web applied to fabric

2. Cut fabric into strips wide enough to accommodate the template.

Fabric strips wide enough to accommodate template
Fabric strips wide enough to accommodate template

 

3. Stack multiple strips, paper side up.

4. For the straight pieces, trim away the excess on all four sides.

Fabric trimmed from all four sides
Fabric trimmed from all four sides

5. For the curved pieces, first trim away the straight edges.

Straight edges trimmed
Straight edges trimmed

6. Then trim away the outer curve.

Outer curve trimmed
Outer curve trimmed

7. Now here’s where it gets tricky . . . for some reason, rotary blades simply will not bend when it comes to the inner curve (believe me, I tried). I can cut the straight section of the inner curve, but not the curvy section. I found the best method is to hold the template in place, and run a pen or pencil along the inner curve of the template. Then, remove the template, and cut the inner curve freehand.

Straight section of inner curve cut and inner curve marked with pen
Straight section of inner curve cut and inner curve marked with pen
Inner curve cut freehand
Inner curve cut freehand

8. For the corner pieces, first trim away the straight edges.

Straight edges trimmed
Straight edges trimmed

9. Then, trim away the outer curves.

First outer curve trimmed
First outer curve trimmed
Second outer curve trimmed
Second outer curve trimmed

10. And again with the tricky part . . . Cut the straight section of the inner curve, hold the template in place, and run a pen or pencil along the inner curve of the template. Then, remove the template and cut the inner curve freehand.

Straight section of inner curve cut and inner curve marked with pen
Straight section of inner curve cut and inner curve marked with pen
Inner curve cut freehand
Inner curve cut freehand

Simple, huh?

May I suggest using a bit of scrap to try your hand at cutting curves freehand? You honestly get better with practice. Take a close look: not all of my cuts are perfect.

Freehand curves practice square
Freehand curves practice square

Another suggestion is to “nest” corner and curved pieces on a strip as shown below, to conserve fabric.

"Nested" corner and curved pieces
“Nested” corner and curved pieces

With this tool, I can cut multiple Celtic knot shapes at one time, and cut shapes of either handedness!!

You can order a set of these from Linda Laney at Baycreek Quilting Products.  Just tell her Raymond sent you!!  A set of five templates costs $25 (there are two shapes not shown for woven Celtic borders).

 

21 thoughts on “Acrylic Celtic Knot Templates!!

    1. Thank you, Ginger . . .

      The set costs $15 (plus postage). Since the site doesn’t have a shopping cart (yet), I am emailing invoices via PayPal. Then, once the invoice is paid, I pack and ship.

      You can email me at: raymond at knotty-celtic-knots dot com, if you’d like.

    1. Thank you, Gene . . .

      Yes, I tried the smallest rotary cutter I could find. Metal blades simply do not bend (and the inner curve on the corner pieces is pretty tight). I ended up with something that looked chewed rather than cut.

  1. I have paypal and I would like to buy your templates.Please tell me what to do. I have been fascinated by your celltic knot since I first saw them on your site.

  2. Raymond, these templates look brilliant! I’m fascinated by celtic knotwork, and these templates would make the process not only much quicker but also much more accurate. I’m in Australia, so could you tell me what the cost of postage would be to send a set of templates over here? Thanks, Cat.

    1. Thank you, Cat!! I’m glad you like the templates . . . and, I agree with you: the process is quicker and more accurate.

      I’ll have to get back to you on postage costs . . . I’ll contact you directly.

  3. That’s pretty neat! I think I’d like a set but it will have to wait until fall. I need to have cataract surgery first.

  4. please send me ordering instructions! i am looking to make a celtic knot quilt for my son and daughter-in-law so this came just in time!

  5. Raymond,
    Are these templates still available? If so could you please advise the cost of shipping to Scotland.
    Thank you.

    1. Yes, the templates are still available!

      Since posting this tutorial, I added two additional shapes for simple Celtic borders. The set of five shapes costs $25 (plus shipping and handling).

      Shipping in the domestic U.S. costs $5.40; shipping to Canada and Mexico costs $13.00; international shipping to the rest of the world costs $20.00.

      Until I add a shopping cart to the site, I will email you an invoive via PayPal, then ship once the invoice has been paid.

      There will be a slight delay until my latest shipment arrives.

  6. I love what you do with your quilts! And your templets are awesome. When I plan to make multiple quilts of the same applique, I draw with a dark marker on some white cotton for placement. Take that to my ironing board, place my background fabric over this. Arrange my pieces for applique on what I’ve drawn, then iron. Takes much less time and less errors. And you can make a big or little as you need.

  7. I have made two by way your reverse applique method. May i send you a couple of pictures? I machine quilted them, which I’m not the greatest at but I try and they hang on my wall at home and at work anyway! Thanks for all your great work!
    Laura

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