All posts by Raymond K. Houston

Woven Celtic Knot

First, I enlarge my chosen knot to use as a template.

Then, I trace each of the paths of the knot on fusible web, fuse to fabric, and cut out as separate loops.

Purple path
Purple path
Blue path
Blue path
Green path
Green path
Yellow path
Yellow path
Orange path
Orange path
Red path
Red path

Next, I use the printed knot as placement guide. I weave the knot from the bottom up, so I locate where the paths go “under” another path near the top of the knot and cut open the loop. I layer the bottom row of loops according to the guide, and pin through all layers (fabric and paper).

Bottom row layered in position and pinned to paper guide
Bottom row layered in position and pinned to paper guide

Then I weave the paths over and under each other, row by row. I pin the two layers of fabric together at each intersection, but not to the paper beneath.

Weaving . . .
Weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving . . .
. . . weaving.
. . . weaving.

Whew!!

The entire knot can be lifted and treated as a single unit at this point. I unpin the bottom row from the paper guide (keeping the layers of fabric together). There is no problem sliding the knot off the paper guide and into position on the background fabric.

Woven Celtic knot transferred to background
Woven Celtic knot transferred to background

I move the piece to my ironing table. I carefully remove all the pins. After a final check of “overs” and “unders” for each path, I fuse the knot in position. From here, I can zig-zag the raw edges, and embellish at will (possibly an embroidered design down the center of each path).

Trip for Two to Boston

Last weekend, I was my baby sister’s “quilting buddy” for a workshop called Trip for Two to Boston. Betty has been bitten by the quilting bug after many years of exposure to me. (Don’t call me contagious.) I was thrilled that she asked me to join her, and we imagined the reactions to a brother/sister quilting team.

The pattern is basically a Trip Around the World (square), or Boston Commons (rectangle). One person cuts and presses, the other person sews. Betty wanted to sew because she recently got a new sewing machine and wanted time to get a feel for it and put it to use; I agreed to cut and press.

Fifteen fabrics were cut into strips, arranged, and sewn together as panels:

Strip-pieced panel
Strip-pieced panel

The buddies work together for two different-looking quilts from the same strip-pieced panel. Here’s Betty with her Trip Around the World (the quilt in the background is “LOLLOO,” a piece I made for her years ago):

Betty holding her Trip Around the World
Betty holding her Trip Around the World

Here’s my Boston Commons:

Boston Commons
Boston Commons

My next step is pin-basting before quilting. I see a lot of Stitch In The Ditch (SITD) in my future.

Tessellation Transformations

All my patchwork uses the same patch:

FKOQR 3x3
FKOQR 3×3

What would happen if I changed the grid the lines were drawn on?

same lines, different grids
same lines, different grids

The relationship of the lines to each other remains the same, but the angles change.

Each of these patches would work well on their own, but what would happen if I stacked rows of them together?

1-1-1-1 Transforming
1-1-1-1 Transforming

You get a tessellation that changes shape before your eyes!